Pancreatic Disease in the U.S.

SSS epidemiologist Constance Ruhl coauthored three posters presented at Digestive Disease Week 2017, coauthored with a researcher from the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases:

  • The Burden of Pancreatic Cancer in the United States Population described the results of an investigation of incidence, 5-year survival, medical care, and mortality among those with a primary diagnosis of pancreatic cancer in several U.S. databases. The authors concluded that the steady rise in new cases annually over the past 2 decades and poor survival rates means the burden remains substantial, particularly among men and African Americans.
  • The Burden of Acute Pancreatitis in the United States Population described an analysis of data from several U.S. databases to estimate medical care and mortality among those with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis. The results showed that hospital stays among those with acute pancreatitis are common and that significant disparities in hospitalization and mortality rates exist among patients.
  • The Burden of Chronic Pancreatitis in the United States Population described an analysis of data from several national databases investigating trends in the chronic pancreatitis burden in the United States. The analysis showed that the condition is a common contributor to hospital stays and may shorten life expectancy. Significant disparities in hospitalization and mortality rates exist among patients, with a higher burden among men and African Americans and a lower burden among Hispanics.